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CBRN Risk Scenarios

  • F. Bruno
  • M. Carestia
  • M. Civica
  • P. Gaudio
  • A. Malizia
  • F. Troiani
  • R. Sciacqua
  • U. Spezia
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology book series (NAPSA)

Abstract

Events of dispersion of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) materials due to natural, accidental or intentional events are considered risk situations and nowadays represent one of the most critical concerns for safety and security. Safe management of these materials, in particular the certainty of its location and control of their transport, is a key issue to be sure that no diversion to unwanted and unauthorized uses occurs. Particularly relevant in the control of the transportation is a stringent cross-border traffic control aimed at avoiding their illicit traffic. Starting from the processes on risk scenarios developed for radiological and nuclear material control, Sogin, in collaboration with the University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, have defined a standard approach for analyzing the preparation of the border points in relation to both safety and security. The proposed approach take into consideration all the relevant aspects of the control such as instrumentation, control procedures and information exchange within the domestic infrastructure and with the other side of the border.

Keywords

CBRN materials Cross-border control Illicit traffic Threats Adversary scenarios Detection system Standard approach Best practice 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Bruno
    • 1
  • M. Carestia
    • 2
  • M. Civica
    • 1
  • P. Gaudio
    • 2
  • A. Malizia
    • 2
  • F. Troiani
    • 1
  • R. Sciacqua
    • 1
  • U. Spezia
    • 1
  1. 1.SOGIN S.p.A.RomeItaly
  2. 2.University of Rome “Tor Vergata”RomeItaly

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