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How Parents Contribute to Children’s Psychological Health: The Critical Role of Psychological Need Support

  • Bart SoenensEmail author
  • Edward L. Deci
  • Maarten Vansteenkiste
Chapter

Abstract

Although different determinants, including genetics, temperament, and a variety of social-contextual influences, play roles in young people’s development, the role of parents is paramount to healthy psychosocial adjustment. When children’s psychological needs are satisfied, children report more well-being, engage in activities with more interest and spontaneity (intrinsic motivation), more easily accept guidelines for important behaviors (internalization), display more openness in social relationships, and are more resilient when faced with adversity and distress. This chapter will focus on how parental supports or thwarts for children’s basic psychological needs either promote or diminish the children’s mental health, social adjustment, and psychological growth.

Keywords

Children’s psychosocial adjustment Basic psychological need satisfaction Parental interaction style Relatedness support Competence support Autonomy support 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bart Soenens
    • 1
    Email author
  • Edward L. Deci
    • 2
  • Maarten Vansteenkiste
    • 1
  1. 1.Ghent UniversityGhentBelgium
  2. 2.University of RochesterRochesterUSA

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