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Liberation Theology and Social Movements

  • Robert MackinEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Handbooks of Sociology and Social Research book series (HSSR)

Abstract

Research on liberation theology and its impact on Latin American social movements is vast and has inspired scholarly debate across a variety of disciplines. This chapter has three objectives. First, I will describe the origins of the liberation theology movement. Second, I will summarize the debates on research addressing variation in liberation theology’s influence during its most influential years (1960s and 1970s). And third, I will explore whether or not or how liberation theology continues to influence contemporary movements. In the conclusion I take up the question of secularization, that is, the declining significance of religion—even in movements with considerable participation of religious individuals.

Keywords

Religion Liberation theology Catholic church Vatican II Chile Brazil Colombia 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Texas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA

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