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Moral Improvement Through Ethics Education

  • Bert Gordijn
Chapter
Part of the Advancing Global Bioethics book series (AGBIO, volume 4)

Abstract

Broadly accepted goals of ethics education are knowledge, skills, and moral improvement. The first goal involves gaining more familiarity with ethical theories, concepts, arguments, debates, important ethicists and so forth. The second one entails acquiring abilities regarding ethical analysis, argumentation, deliberation, and the like. The third goal involves moral improvement of behavior.

Keywords

Ethic Education Moral Behavior Moral Education Practical Wisdom Nicomachean Ethic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of EthicsDublin City UniversityDublinIreland

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