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Creative Insight: The Social Dimension of a Solitary Moment

  • Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
  • Keith Sawyer
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter we will present a different perspective, by expanding out from this moment in time and embedding it within the other relevant stages of the creative process. When we look at the complete “life span” of a creative insight in our subjects’ experience, the moment of insight appears as but one short flash in a complex, time-consuming, fundamentally social process. It is true that the individuals we interviewed generally report their insights as occurring in solitary moments: during a walk, while taking a shower, or while lying in bed just after waking.

Keywords

Hard Work Idle Time Creative Process Conscious Awareness Preparation Stage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgment

This research was supported by a grant from the Spencer Foundation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi
    • 1
  • Keith Sawyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Claremont Graduate UniversityClaremontUSA

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