Introduction: Learning from Natural Hazards Experience to Adapt to Climate Change

Chapter
Part of the Environmental Hazards book series (ENHA)

Abstract

This book explores lessons learned from the study and real-world experience of natural hazards to help communities plan for and adapt to climate change.

Keywords

Climate change adaptation Natural hazards risk management Natural hazards planning Climate resilience Sustainable development 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of People, Environment & Planning Massey UniversityPalmerston NorthNew Zealand
  2. 2.UNC at Chapel HillNorth CarolinaUSA

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