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On the Mutuality of Human Motivation and Relationships

  • Netta Weinstein
  • Cody R. DeHaan
Chapter

Abstract

Motivational processes are responsible for initiating and directing human activity; they energize behavior, generate and increase task engagement, and direct actions toward certain ends or goals. They are also inextricably linked with relational experiences. People bring their goals, values, hopes, and past regulatory experiences to bear on various types of relationships and interactions. The nature of these motivational forces that bring people into contact with each other, and that keep them interacting, plays a critical role in relationships. The chapters collected in this book describe the links between human motivation and the influential interactions and relationships that shape individuals’ daily lives and long-term experiences.

Keywords

Positive Affect Intrinsic Motivation Romantic Relationship Autonomy Support Human Motivation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of EssexColchesterUK
  2. 2.Department of Clinical and Social Sciences in PsychologyUniversity of RochesterRochesterUSA

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