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Toward a Better Understanding of Equity in Higher Education Finance and Policy

  • Luciana DarEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Higher Education: Handbook of Theory and Research book series (HATR, volume 29)

Abstract

This chapter addresses the question: under what conditions do higher education policies promote equity? I argue that the lack of shared knowledge and precision over what constitutes equity-enhancing policies undermines our efforts to identify and compare educational policies and practices that reconcile individual and public needs in a democracy. I review the theoretical and philosophical foundations of the terms equality and equity, paying particular attention to the contributions of political philosophers interested in (higher) education as a means of achieving distributive fairness, followed by a discussion of the application challenges involved in defining, measuring, and evaluating empirically whether a particular policy or outcome is more or less equitable.

Keywords

High Education Social Justice Community College Social Network Analysis Distributive Justice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

 The author wishes to thank Laura Perna and Michael Paulsen for their support and insights throughout the writing of this chapter. The author also thanks Lewis Luartz, Jacob Apkarian, and Sarah Yoshikawa for their outstanding research assistance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationUniversity of California, RiversideRiversideUSA

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