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Judicial Organization

  • Mauro Cappelletti
  • Joseph M. Perillo

Abstract

This chapter discusses the organization of both the ordinary and special courts and the Constitutional Court (3.01–3.03). It further describes the training, appointment, promotion, and legal and economic status of judges (3.04–3.08), and provides particulars concerning court clerks (3.09), and ufficiali giudiziari (3.10).

Keywords

Supra Note Criminal Case Civil Procedure High Court Royal Decree 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    The competence of the ordinary and special courts is discussed in more detail in chapter 4.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
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  63. 63.
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  64. 64.
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  67. 67.
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  69. 69.
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  70. 70.
    Codice di procedura civile arts. 137, 151. For the rules governing service, see 7.14 infra.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1965

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mauro Cappelletti
  • Joseph M. Perillo

There are no affiliations available

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