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Fluorescence Induction in a Thylakoid System Reconstituted for Photosynthetic Carbon Assimilation

  • Peter Horton
  • Pam Lee
  • Susan Anderson
Part of the Advances in Agricultural Biotechnology book series (AABI, volume 3)

Abstract

Upon illumination of leaves, the yield of fluorescence from chlorophyll decreases from a maximum (P) reached within ls to a steady state (T) several minutes later. During the PT quenching a series of transients are observed, a characteristic induction curve being described as PS1M1S2M2...SnMnT e.g. (Quick & Horton, these proceedings). Events occuring during the first few seconds are likely to reflect electron transfer and photophosphorylation only, whereas slower events are increasingly influenced by the onset of photosynthetic carbon assimilation. The yield of fluorescence under physiological conditions is affected by two major quenching processes, the oxidation state of O, (qO) and the trans-thylakoid ΔpH (qe). Before fluorescence measurement can be used to provide a non-intrusive assay of photosynthesis a clearer understanding is required of the interaction between qO and qe and their relationship to rates of electron transfer, ATP turnover and carbon assimilation. It is the aim of this study to provide in vitro simulation. of the mechanism and resultant fluorescence transients observable in vivo. For this we have used the reconstituted chloroplast system described by Lilley and Walker (1976). This system consists of thylakoids to which are added cofactors such as ferredoxin, ADP and NADP, and a stromal extract.

Keywords

Chlorophyll Fluorescence Carbon Assimilation Fluorescence Induction Fluorescence Transient Photosynthetic Carbon Assimilation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Horton P (1983). Relations between electron transport and carbon assimilation; simultaneous measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence, transthylakoid pH gradient and O2 evolution in isolated chloroplasts Proc.R.Soc.Lond. B217, 405–415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Lilley R.McC and Walker DA (1979). Studies with the reconstituted chloroplast system. Encyclopedia of plant physiology (ed. M. Gibbs, E. Latzko), vol. 6. (Photosynthesis II), pp 41–53, Berlin, Heidelberg and New York: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  3. Walker, DA (1981). Secondary fluorescence kinetics of spinach leaves in relation to the onset of photosynthetic carbon assimilation. Planta 153, 273–278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Walker, DA; Horton, P; Sivak, M and Quick, WP (1983a). Antiparallel relationships between O2 evolution and slow fluorescence induction kinetics. Photobiochem. Photobiophys. 5, 35–39.Google Scholar
  5. Walker, DA; Sivak, MN; Prinsley, RT and Cheesbrough, JK (1983b). Simultaneous measurement of oscillations in oxygen evolution and chlorphyll a fluorescence in leaf pieces. Plant Physiol. in press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Horton
    • 1
  • Pam Lee
    • 1
  • Susan Anderson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry and ARC Research Group on PhotosynthesisUniversity of SheffieldSheffieldUK

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