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Generalized alignment

  • John J. McCarthy
  • Alan Prince
Part of the Yearbook of Morphology book series (YOMO)

Abstract

Overt or covert reference to the edges of constituents is a commonplace throughout phonology and morphology. Some examples include:

Keywords

Left Edge Syllable Structure Generalize Alignment Prosodic Structure Alignment Constraint 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • John J. McCarthy
    • 1
  • Alan Prince
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of LinguisticsUniversity of Massachusetts, AmherstAmherstUSA
  2. 2.Dept. of LinguisticsRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

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