Phytopathology and Tissue Culture Alliances

  • H. V. Amerson
  • R. L. Mott
Part of the Forestry Sciences book series (FOSC, volume 5)

Abstract

This volume is primarily devoted to tissue culture as related to forestry. Application of tissue culture to forest species has only a short history, thus little information is available on its use for in vitro forest pathology. However, the potentials of in vitro cultures for the study of phytopathology have been demonstrated with horticultural and agricultural plants which have a rich tissue culture tradition. It is worth our time to become aware of these potentials and technologies because the in vitro approach may find its best expression in forestry where the study of pathology is hampered by tree size, rugged terrain and variable environment over the long forest life.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. V. Amerson
  • R. L. Mott

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