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Continuative Aspect and the Dative Clitic in Kambera

  • Marian Klamer
Part of the Studies in Natural Language and Linguistic Theory book series (SNLT, volume 49)

Abstract

Kambera is an Austronesian language of the Sumba-Biwa group of Central Malayo-Polynesian languages, spoken by approximately 150,000 speakers on the eastern part of the island of Sumba in Eastern Indonesia. Klamer (1994) provides a detailed description of the language. This paper discusses one of the most salient constructions in Kambera: the continuative aspect construction. This construction is illustrated in (1).

Keywords

Verbal Argument Matrix Subject Nominal Predicate Intransitive Verb Nominal Clause 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

A

accusative

APP

applicative morpheme

ART

article (na - singular, da - plural)

CLF

classifier, CNJ - conjunction, CTR - marker of controlled clause

D

dative, DEI - deictic element (space/time)

DEM

demonstrative

EMP

emphasis marker

G

genitive

IMPF

imperfective

LOC

locative preposition

MOD

mood marker

N

nominative

NEG

negation

PRF

perfective

RDP

reduplication.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marian Klamer

There are no affiliations available

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