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The ATF Canine Explosives Detection Program

  • Richard A. Strobel
  • Robert Noll
  • Charles R. MidkiffJr.
Conference paper

Abstract

Explosives detection technology has advanced significantly in the past few years. Even with those advances many of the instrumental techniques still are unable to meet current needs. Additionally, evaluation of several canine explosives detection programs found them to be deficient on an operational basis. In response, ATF developed a pilot training program for explosives detection canines in 1991. The training concepts used included: 1. food reward conditioning; 2. scientific oversight of proficiency testing; 3. use of small amounts of a wide range of explosive compounds representative of those in use today. Advantages of the training program included dogs capable of working with multiple handlers and sensitive to a wide range of concealed explosive products at quantities as low as 15 grams. Additionally the training program could be completed in six weeks and at minimal cost.

Keywords

Sodium Chlorate Potassium Chlorate Explosive Detection Nitrate Ester Potassium Perchlorate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard A. Strobel
    • 1
  • Robert Noll
    • 1
  • Charles R. MidkiffJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Forensic Science LaboratoryBureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and FirearmsRockvilleUSA

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