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‘The Long Chain’: Archaeology, Historical Landscape Characterization and Time Depth in the Landscape

  • Graham Fairclough
Part of the Landscape series book series (LAEC, volume 1)

Abstract

Landscape Assessment in England in its modern sense has origins in the late 1980s, following unsuccessful attempts to produce objective, quantified methods (Countryside Commission 1987; 1993; Countryside Agency & Scottish Natural Heritage 2002). More broadly, the method can be carried back to the 1940s and 1950s and the creation of the first UK protected areas, known in UK legislation as National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty using criteria of ‘specialness’, perceived naturalness and aesthetic quality. Going back further, there is a long English tradition of landscape assessment based on the aesthetic values of landscape; this included interest in consciously designed high status ornamental landscape. For some heritage managers and planners, ‘landscape’ still seems to mean only ‘natural’ or ‘designed’ landscape.

Keywords

Historic Environment Time Depth Landscape Management Historic Landscape Heritage Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Graham Fairclough
    • 1
  1. 1.English HeritageUK

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