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Inhibition of Signal Transduction Leading to Appressorium Formation in Magnaporthe Grisea by Glisoprenins

  • E. Thines
  • F. Eilbert
  • H. Anke
  • O. Sterner
Part of the Developments in Plant Pathology book series (DIPP, volume 15)

Abstract

From submerged cultures of the deuteromycete Gliocladium roseum, strain HA190–95, glisoprenins A, C, D and E were isolated as inhibitors of appressorium formation in Magnaporthe grisea. The compounds inhibited formation of infection structures on hydrophobic, stimulating surfaces. Glisoprenin E was ten times less active compared to the other glisoprenins. Formation of appressoria on nonstimulating surfaces, induced by the cAMP analogue 8-(4-chloro-phenylthio)adenosine-3’,5’-monophosphate or by 1,16-hexadecanediol, a plant wax component, was not affected by glisoprenins, indicating that at least two signal transduction pathways are involved in appressorium formation in M. grisea. Inhibition of appressorium development by glisoprenins on hydrophobic surface could he reversed in a competitive manner by 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol, a known activator of protein kinase C (PKC) but not by 1-oleoyl–2-acetylglycerol, the most effective inducer of PKC in mammalian cells.

Keywords

Hydrophobic Surface Cholesterol Acyl Transferase Appressorium Formation Rice Blast Fungus Competitive Manner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Thines
    • 1
  • F. Eilbert
    • 2
  • H. Anke
    • 2
  • O. Sterner
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Biological SciencesUniversity of Exeter, Washington Singer LaboratoriesExeterUnited Kingdom
  2. 2.Dept. of BiotechnologyUniversity of KaiserslauternKaiserslauternGermany
  3. 3.Organic Chemistry 2University of LundLundSweden

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