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The Government of “Democratic Centralism”: Political Institutions under the Constitution of 1954

  • William L. Tung

Abstract

“Democratic centralism” is the characteristic of the government system of all socialist countries, which practice centralism on the basis of democracy, and democracy under central guidance. The people’s authority is vested in the people’s congresses, which elect and supervise the people’s councils on the same levels for the execution and administration of the policies and programs decided by the congresses. In Communist China, the plenary session of the CPPCC functioned as the temporary National People’s Congress during the transitional period of 1949–1954. On the local level, the all-circles representative conferences exercised certain powers and functions of the local people’s congresses. With the promulgation of the Constitution of the People’s Republic of China in 1954, the people’s congresses became the supreme authority on both national and local levels.

Keywords

Communist Party State Council National People National Minority Autonomous Prefecture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, Netherlands 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • William L. Tung
    • 1
  1. 1.Queens CollegeCity University of New YorkUSA

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