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The Communist Party in Power: Mao’s Political Thought and the Party Organization

  • William L. Tung

Abstract

When the civil war resumed after the breakdown of peace negotiations in 1947, the Communists intensified their efforts to win popular support for the eventual control of the country. On October 10, 1947, the “Chinese People’s Liberation Army” issued a declaration, calling upon all the Chinese people to overthrow the National Government and build a new China on the basis of Communist programs. On the same day, a new land law was announced. It was to be enforced in the “liberated areas” for the re-distribution of land among the peasants.

Keywords

Communist Party Chinese Communist Party Central Committee Party Member Party Organization 
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References

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, Netherlands 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • William L. Tung
    • 1
  1. 1.Queens CollegeCity University of New YorkUSA

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