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Medical Sociology

  • Frederick Sierles

Abstract

Medical sociology is the study of how being in categories like social class, ethnic group, religion, and occupation affects the definition, incidence, prevalence, manifestations, and treatment of illness. Physicians should know about medical sociology because it contributes to understanding the multiple causes of illness and provides information about what illnesses and patient care problems to look out for. For example, although infection with the tubercle bacillus is a necessary cause of tuberculosis, tuberculosis is largely a disease of the poor and disadvantaged, who are more likely to be infected by the bacillus, are more susceptible to its effects, and are slower in reporting its symptoms to a doctor. In this chapter, I will present the core concepts of medical sociology, then catalogue correlations between social factors and the definition, incidence, manifestations, and treatment of illness, concluding with a discussion of some of the causes of these correlations.

Keywords

Familial Mediterranean Fever Ethyl Benzene Methyl Alcohol Benzyl Chloride Methyl Chloride 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Spectrum Publications 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick Sierles

There are no affiliations available

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