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Behavioral Medicine

  • Frederick Sierles

Abstract

To me, the term behavioral medicine is preferable to the term psychosomatic medicine, for the latter implies that the “mind” and the body are somehow different or separate. Behavior is the product of brain function; brain functions and the functions of the rest of the body are inextricably intertwined. The brain is an organ which functions under the same laws of nature as the kidney, liver, and lungs. A number of phenomena support this conclusion.

Keywords

Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Behavioral Medicine Coronary Care Unit Postoperative Delirium Psychiatric Aspect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Spectrum Publications 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick Sierles

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