Advertisement

The Hula Valley (Northern Israel) Wetlands Rehabilitation Project

  • K. David Hambright
  • Tamar Zohary

Abstract

In the 1950s, Lake Hula, a natural shallow lake surrounded by swamps in the Hula Valley of northern Israel, was drained. Ecological problems resulting from the draining led to partial reflooding in the mid-1990s. This chapter provides an overview of the restoration of this unique arid-region wetland.

Keywords

Dust Storm Peat Soil Water Table Elevation Israeli Society Wetland Ecology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Ashkenazi, S. and Ch. Dimentman. 1998. Ecology of the avian fauna of the Agmon wetlands in northern Israel. Wetlands Ecology and Management (In press).Google Scholar
  2. Avnimelech Y., S. Dasberg, A. Harpaz, and l. Levin. 1977. Prevention of nitrate leakage from the Hula Basin: A case study in watershed management. Soil Sciences 125:233–239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Dasberg, S. and S.P. Neuman. 1977. Peat hydrology in the Hula Basin, Israel. I. Properties of peat. Journal of Hydrology 32:219–239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Degani G., Y. Yehuda, K. Jackson, and M. Gophen. 1998. The fish community of Lake Agmon, northern Israel. Wetlands Ecology and Management (In press).Google Scholar
  5. Dimentman, Ch., H.J. Bromley, and F.D. Por. 1992. Lake Hula: reconstruction of the fauna and hydrobiology of a lost lake. Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Jerusalem, Israel.Google Scholar
  6. Geifman, Y. and M. Rom. 1995. Loading from the Jordan River basin to Lake Kinneret. Analysis of events and changes. Mekoroth Water Co. Watershed Unit Report (in Hebrew).Google Scholar
  7. Hambright, K.D., I. Bar-llan, and W. Eckert. 1998. General water chemistry and quality in Lake Agmon, Israel. Wetlands Ecology and Management (In press).Google Scholar
  8. Harpaz, A. 1996. The impact of human intervention on natural processes: The Hula Valley projects as a case study, pp. 656–657 In Y. Steinberger (ed.) Preservation of Our World in the Wake of Change, Vol. VI A/B. Sixth International Conference of the Israeli Society for Ecology and Environmental Quality Sciences. Jerusalem, Israel.Google Scholar
  9. Horowitz A. 1973. Development of the Hula basin, Israel. Israel Journal of Earth Sciences 22:107–139.Google Scholar
  10. Kaplan D., T. Oron, and M. Gutman. 1998. Development of macrophytic vegetation in the Agmon wetlands of Israel by spontaneous colonization and reintroduction. Wetlands Ecology and Management (In press).Google Scholar
  11. Karmon, Y. 1960. The drainage of the Huleh swamps. Geographical Review 50:169–193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Markel D., E. Sass, B. Lazar, and A. Bein. 1998. Major biogeochemical processes in the newly created Lake Agmon, Hula Valley, Northern Israel. Wetlands Ecology and Management (In press).Google Scholar
  13. Neuman, S.P. and S. Dasberg. 1977. Peat hydrology in the Hula Basin, Israel. II. Subsurface flow regime. Journal of Hydrology 32:241–256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Ponnamperuma, F.N. 1972. The chemistry of submerged soils. Advances in Agronomy 24:29–96.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Raveh, A. and Y. Avnimelech. 1973. Minimizing nitrates seepage from the Hula Valley into Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee): I. Enhancement of nitrate reduction by sprinkling and flooding. Journal of Environmental Quality 2:455–458.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Serruya, C. 1978. Lake Kinneret. Dr. W. Junk Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Shaham, G. 1996. The Hula Project: dynamics of human intervention in nature, pp. 648–651 In Y. Steinberger (ed.) Preservation of Our World in the Wake of Change, Vol. VI A/B. Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference of the Israeli Society for Ecology and Environmental Quality Sciences. Jerusalem, Israel.Google Scholar
  18. Shaham G., Ch. Mintzker, and G. Knaan. 1989. Alternative uses for the Hula soils: feasibility survey. Report to the Hula Authority, Ministry of Agriculture, Tel Aviv, Israel (in Hebrew).Google Scholar
  19. Shalom U., H. Pener, H.J. Bromley, M. Muskin, and Ch. Dimentman. 1996. The mosquito fauna of the new Hula wetland, pp. 677–680 In Y. Steinberger (ed.) Preservation of Our World in the Wake of Change, Vol. VI A/B. Sixth International Conference of the Israeli Society for Ecology and Environmental Quality Sciences. Jerusalem, Israel.Google Scholar
  20. Shoham, D. and I. Levin. 1968. Subsidence in the reclaimed Hula Swamp area in Israel. Israel Journal Agricultural Research 18:15–18.Google Scholar
  21. Shy, E. 1998. Repopulation and colonization by birds in the newly created Agmon wetland, Israel. Wetlands Ecology and Management (In press).Google Scholar
  22. Tahal Engineers and Consultants. 1992. Development plan for the dry Hula area: Planning alternatives. Report No. 1, to the Hula Authority, Ministry of Agriculture, Tel Aviv, Israel (in Hebrew).Google Scholar
  23. Tsipris, J. and M. Meron. 1998. Climatic and hydrological aspects of the Hula Restoration Project. Wetlands Ecology and Management (In press).Google Scholar
  24. Zohary, M. and G. Orshansky. 1947. The vegetation of the Huleh plain. Palestine Journal of Botany (Jerusalem) 4:90–104.Google Scholar
  25. Zohary T., U. Pollingher, B. Kaplan, and T. Fishbein. 1998. Phytoplankton-phytobenthos dynamics in a newly-created subtropical wetland. Wetlands Ecology and Management (In press).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. David Hambright
    • 1
  • Tamar Zohary
    • 1
  1. 1.Israel Oceanographic and Limnological Research, The Yigal Allon Kinneret Limnological LaboratoryTiberiasIsrael

Personalised recommendations