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Problems of Runoff Modeling Which are Particular to the Area or Climate Being Modeled

  • David R. Dawdy
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIC, volume 345)

Abstract

Models of hydrologic systems are influenced by local climate and topography. The choice of models should consider particular characteristics and problems as related to various climates and physiographic regions. Arctic hydrology, snow-melt hydrology, temperate as opposed to arid-zone hydrology, and hydrology of very flat areas, problems involved in modeling in particular areas or climates, what is being done to overcome those problems, and areas of needed research are discussed.

Keywords

Hydrologic System Runoff Modeling Snowmelt Runoff Physiographic Region Distribute Parameter Model 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • David R. Dawdy
    • 1
  1. 1.San FranciscoUSA

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