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Environmental impact of Kuwait oil fires: upper atmosphere

  • Muhammad Sadiq
  • John C. McCain
Chapter
Part of the Environment & Assessment book series (ENAS, volume 4)

Abstract

The burning oil wells in Kuwait, no doubt, created the world’s largest oil field fire in history. The environmental implications of the oil fires generated tremendous media and scientific interest.

Keywords

Soot Particle Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer World Meteorological Organization Fire Source 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Muhammad Sadiq
    • 1
  • John C. McCain
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Research InstituteKing Fahd University of Petroleum and MineralsDhahranSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.Department of GeologyTexas Christian UniversityFt. WorthUSA

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