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RFLP map of soybean

  • Randy C. Shoemaker
Part of the Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Plants book series (CMBP, volume 1)

Abstract

The soybean is one of the oldest cultivated crops. It first emerged as a domesticated plant around the 11th century B.C. (Hymowitz 1970), although references to soybean appear in books written over 4500 years ago (Smith and Huyser 1987). The soybean was first planted in the United States in Thunderbolt, GA, in 1765 (Hymowitz and Harlan 1983). It was originally planted as a forage crop but by the early 1900’s became of interest as an oilseed crop (Smith and Huyser 1987), an interest that continues today.

Keywords

Quantitative Trait Locus Linkage Group Soybean Genome Seed Coat Color Vegetative Storage Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Randy C. Shoemaker
    • 1
  1. 1.USDA-ARS-FCR, Department of AgronomyIowa State UniversityAmesUSA

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