A model for a comprehensive LIMS

  • R. D. McDowall

Abstract

Demands on many laboratory organizations are becoming a driving force to automate analytical procedures. Automation, which is generally focused at the bench, allows an analyst to complete more work per unit time, resulting in higher productivity. Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) have been developed to carry out many associated administrative tasks and procedures required to run a laboratory. However, many organizations often take a narrow view of both a laboratory and the functions that can be automated, preventing them from extending automation to provide real scientific and business benefits.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. D. McDowall

There are no affiliations available

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