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The Synthesis and the Synthetic Theory

  • John Beatty
Part of the Science and Philosophy book series (SCPH, volume 2)

Abstract

Commentators on the evolutionary synthesis frequently identify that event with the formulation of the “synthetic theory.” According to the simplest such characterization of the synthesis, Mendelian genetic theory and Darwinian evolutionary theory — once considered irreconcilable — were eventually reconciled in the theory of population genetics, which is the core of the synthetic theory. That reconciliation itself constituted the much-heralded synthesis.1

Keywords

Evolutionary Change Evolutionary Biologist Evolutionary Synthesis Random Drift Synthetic Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, Dordrecht 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Beatty
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Ecology and Behavioral BiologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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