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Effect of pharmacological agents on macrophage accumulation

  • N. Ackerman
  • A. Tomolonis
  • L. Miram
  • J. Kheifets
  • S. Martinez
  • A. Carter
Part of the Inflammation: Mechanisms and Treatment book series (FTIN, volume 4)

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by an influx of both polymorphonuclear (PMN) and mononuclear leukocytes into various inflammatory sites1,2. These infiltrating cells are, in part, responsible for a number of pathological events resulting ultimately in protease release and connective tissue catabolism. Over the past 10 years a number of in vivo models of leukocyte infiltration have been described3–5. Most have been aimed at PMN accumulation and the effects of pharmacological agents on this process. In the current studies, a model of macrophage accumulation was developed; in addition, the effects of steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories and anti-rheumatic agents were determined.

Keywords

Acridine Orange Pleural Cavity Macrophage Accumulation Carrageenan Injection Gold Sodium Thiomalate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Ackerman
    • 1
  • A. Tomolonis
    • 1
  • L. Miram
    • 1
  • J. Kheifets
    • 1
  • S. Martinez
    • 1
  • A. Carter
    • 1
  1. 1.USA

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