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Abnormal Gastrointestinal Motility in Diabetics and after Vagotomy

  • G. E. Foster
  • D. F. Evans
  • J. R. Arden-Jones
  • A. Beattie
  • J. D. Hardcastle

Abstract

The most widely performed operation for peptic ulcer disease is a truncal vagotomy and drainage procedure. Intermittent diarrhoea is seen in 20% of cases following this operation and this can be prolonged and incapacitating in 5% of individuals (1) overshadowing any direct benefit due to the surgery. A number of subjects with well controlled diabetes mellitus suffer from the gastrointestinal side effects of bloating after food and intractable diarrhoea, often of a very urgent nature (2). Two clinical conditions can thus coexist with severe abnormalities of gastrointestinal motility. We have previously described abnormal fasting jejunal rhythms in such subjects (3) but studies that have endeavoured to identify a specific site or sites of abnormal activity have been few (4) (5).

Keywords

Gastric Emptying Gastrointestinal Motility Activity Front Truncal Vagotomy Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. E. Foster
  • D. F. Evans
  • J. R. Arden-Jones
  • A. Beattie
  • J. D. Hardcastle

There are no affiliations available

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