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Motilin Release and the Migrating Myoelectric Complexes

  • S. Sarna
  • W. Chey
  • R. Condon
  • W. Dodds
  • T. Myers
  • T. Chang

Abstract

The occurrence of phase III activity in the upper small intestine is generally associated with a peak in the plasma motilin level (1,2,3). Exogenous motilin, when injected during the relatively refractory state of an MMC cycle, initiates phase III activity prematurely (4,5). These two observations led some investigators to conclude that plasma motilin level cycles spontaneously and when plasma motilin level reaches a peak or a certain threshold, it initiates a phase III activity in the duodenum which then migrates distally.

Keywords

Gastrointestinal Motility Proximal Jejunum Refractory State Plasma Motilin Spontaneous Phase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Sarna
  • W. Chey
  • R. Condon
  • W. Dodds
  • T. Myers
  • T. Chang

There are no affiliations available

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