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Alcoholism — disease or self-inflicted vice?

  • John Fry
  • Benno Pollak
  • Ken Young
  • W. E. Fabb

Abstract

Alcoholism comprises a huge and largely hidden collection of medical and social problems. The causal factor is clear and evident, but the effects depend very much on individual, family and community features. Consumption of alcohol is almost a universal social custom — fewer than 20 per cent of adults are strict teetotallers — and its problems and control involve politicians, teachers, lawyers, police, social workers, industrialists as well as physicians. Who should take actions?

Keywords

Drinking Problem Family Practitioner Social Drinker Disease Concept Sick Role 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Reference

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Copyright information

© MTP Press Limited 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Fry
  • Benno Pollak
  • Ken Young
  • W. E. Fabb

There are no affiliations available

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