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Getting the Description Right and Making It Count: Ethical Practice in Mathematics Education Research

  • Jill Adler
  • Stephen Lerman
Part of the Springer International Handbooks of Education book series (SIHE, volume 10)

Abstract

Building on the work on ethics in educational research in recent publications, we present a framework for ethical practice in mathematics education research. In particular, we discuss what are the implications of claiming or denying a particular piece of research as acceptable within the community. We argue that researchers must be aware for whom they advocate, thus making it count. We present a map with which researchers should engage the ethics of their practice, and we suggest that they must consider whether they are getting the description right.

Keywords

Mathematics Education Educational Research Education Research Mathematics Education Research Mathematics Teacher Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jill Adler
    • 1
  • Stephen Lerman
    • 2
  1. 1.University of the WitwatersrandSouth Africa
  2. 2.South Bank UniversityUK

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