Advertisement

Virtue and the Practice of Nursing

  • Martin Benjamin
  • Joy Curtis
Part of the Philosophy and Medicine book series (PHME, volume 17)

Abstract

When, in the mid-nineteenth century, Florence Nightingale revolutionized nursing, practically all nurses were women and what counted as a good or virtuous woman reflected the values and ideals of Victorian England. Thus a question arises as to what extent Nightingale’s conception of a ‘good and intelligent nurse’ can be justified today when health care has been radically transformed by new knowledge and technology and our conception of a good or virtuous woman differs significantly from that which prevailed in her time.

Keywords

Nursing Practice Christian Tradition Hospital Nursing American Hospital Association Internal Good 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. [1]
    Agonito, R.: 1977, History of Ideas on Woman: A Source Book, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    American Hospital Association: 1973, ‘Statement on a Patient’s Bill of Rights’, Hospitals 47, 41.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    American Nurses’ Association: 1976, Code for Nurses with Interpretive Statements, American Nurses’ Association, Kansas City, Missouri.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    American Nurses’ Association: 1980, Nursing: A Social Policy Statement, American Nurses’ Association, Kansas City, Missouri.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Ashley, J. A.: 1976, Hospitals, Paternalism, and the Role of the Nurse, Teachers College Press, Columbia University, New York.Google Scholar
  6. [6]
    Baly, M. E.: 1980, Nursing and Social Change, 2nd ed., William Heinemann Medical Books Ltd., London.Google Scholar
  7. [7]
    Boyd, N.: 1982, Josephine Butler, Octavia Hill, Florence Nightingale: Three Victorian Women Who Changed Their World, MacMillan, New York.Google Scholar
  8. [8]
    Dock, L. L.: 1912, A History of Nursing, Vol. 3, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  9. [9]
    Dock, L. L. and Stewart, I. M.: 1938, A Short History of Nursing, 4th ed., G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  10. [10]
    Douglass, J. D.: 1974, ‘Women and the Continental Reformation’, in R. R. Reuther (ed.), Religion and Sexism: Images of Women in the Jewish and Christian Traditions, Simon and Schuster, New York, pp. 292–318.Google Scholar
  11. [11]
    Jameton, A. L.: 1983, Nursing Practice: The Ethical Issues, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.Google Scholar
  12. [12]
    Kalisch, P. A. and Kaiisch, B. J.: 1978, The Advance of Modern Nursing, Little, Brown and Company, Boston.Google Scholar
  13. [13]
    Kalisch, P. A. and Kalisch, B. J.: 1982, ‘The Image of Nurses in Novels’, American Journal of Nursing 82, 1220–1224.Google Scholar
  14. [14]
    Kalisch, P. A. and Kalisch, B. J.: 1982, ‘The Nurse as a Sex Object in Motion Pictures 1930–1980’, Research in Nursing and Health 5, 147–154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. [15]
    Kalisch, P. A. and Kalisch, B. J.: 1982, ‘The World of Nursing in Prime Time Television, 1950–1980’, Nursing Research 31, 358–363.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. [16]
    Kempf, F. C.: 1957, The Person as a Nurse, 2nd ed., MacMillan Company, New York.Google Scholar
  17. [17]
    MacIntyre, A.: 1981, After Virtue, University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, Indiana.Google Scholar
  18. [18]
    McLaughlin, E. C.: 1974, ‘Equality of Souls, Inequality of Sexes: Woman in Medieval Theology’, in R. R. Ruether (ed.), Religion and Sexism: Images of Women in the Jewish and Christian Traditions, Simon and Schuster, New York, pp. 213–266.Google Scholar
  19. [19]
    Morris, W. (ed.): 1969, The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, American Heritage Publishing Co., Inc., and Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston.Google Scholar
  20. [20]
    Nutting, M. A. and Dock, L. L.: 1907, A History of Nursing, Vol. 1, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  21. [21]
    Nutting, M. A. and Dock, L. L.: 1907, A History of Nursing, Vol. 2, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, New York.Google Scholar
  22. [22]
    Parvey, C. F.: 1974, ‘The Theology and Leadership of Women in the New Testament’, in R. R. Ruether (ed.), Religion and Sexism: Images of Women in the Jewish and Christian Traditions, Simon and Schuster, New York, pp. 117–149.Google Scholar
  23. [23]
    Ruether, R. R.: 1974, ‘Misogynism and Virginal Feminism in the Fathers of the Church’, in R. R. Ruether (ed.), Religion and Sexism: Images of Women in the Jewish and Christian Traditions, Simon and Schuster, New York, pp. 150–183.Google Scholar
  24. [24]
    Smith, F. T.: 1981, ‘Florence Nightingale: Early Feminist’, American Journal of Nursing 81, 1021–1024.Google Scholar
  25. [25]
    Styles, M. M.: 1982, On Nursing: Toward a New Endowment, C. V. Mosby Company, St. Louis.Google Scholar
  26. [26]
    Sward, K. M.: 1978, ‘The Code for Nurses: An Historical Perspective’, in American Nurses’ Association, Perspectives on the Code for Nurses, American Nurses’ Association, Kansas City, Missouri, pp. 1–9.Google Scholar
  27. [27]
    Veatch, R. M.: 1980, ‘Professional Ethics: New Principles for Physicians’, Hastings Center Report 10, 16–19.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© D. Reidel Publishing Company 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Benjamin
    • 1
  • Joy Curtis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Philosophy, College of NursingMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

Personalised recommendations