Coniferous forests of the Pacific Northwest

  • James P. Lassoie
  • Thomas M. Hinckley
  • Charles C. Grier
Chapter

Abstract

The coniferous forests described in this chapter are primarily those of Oregon, Washington, southern British Columbia, western Montana, and Idaho. This forest region is sharply bounded on the west by the Pacific Ocean, on the east by the crest of the Rocky Mountains, and ranges from central coastal California and southern Oregon to the southeast Alaskan coast. Altogether the region includes several major forest zones, their distributions mainly reflecting differences in annual temperature and moisture balances.

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© Chapman and Hall 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • James P. Lassoie
  • Thomas M. Hinckley
  • Charles C. Grier

There are no affiliations available

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