The Jarrah Forest pp 67-87

Part of the Geobotany book series (GEOB, volume 13) | Cite as

Jarrah dieback — A disease caused by Phytophthora cinnamomi

  • B. Dell
  • N. Malajczuk

Abstract

Phytophthora cinnamomi Rands, a soilborne pathogen, is the cause of the disease jarrah dieback, which is destroying the indigenous jarrah forests in Western Australia (Podger 1968, 1972, Newhook & Podger 1972, Batini & Hopkins 1972) and is the major fungal pathogen causing eucalypt dieback in eastern Australia (Marks et al. 1972, Weste & Taylor 1971, Pratt & Heather 1972, Pratt & Heather 1973b, Bird et al. 1975, Podger 1975, 1981, Weste & Marks 1987). The disease affects not only Eucalyptus species but a number of major understorey and ground flora species as well. Lists of susceptible species have been published by Titze & Palzer (1969), Pratt & Heather (1972) and Weste & Taylor (1971) and these include over four hundred species belonging to forty different families. The most susceptible species belong to the families Proteaceae, Leguminoseae, Epacridaceae, Myrtaceae and Xanthorrhoeaceae.

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© Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Dell
  • N. Malajczuk

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