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New Zealand

  • Matthew S. Mcglone
Chapter
Part of the Handbook of vegetation science book series (HAVS, volume 7)

Abstract

Most work in plant ecology and vegetation history has been carried out within the northern temperate zone. Inevitably, the vegetation history of any part of the globe outside of this zone — and in particular outside of western Europe and eastern and mid-western North America — will be interpreted in terms of that region. It is therefore important to note that New Zealand, although it lies within equivalent latitudes to the northern temperate zone, presents marked contrasts in both its climates and biota.

Keywords

Glacial Maximum Pollen Diagram Zealand Journal Pollen Spectrum Tree Fern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

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  • Matthew S. Mcglone

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