Abstract

Wheat is arguably the most important food crop in the world. World wheat production currently stands at about 550 million metric tons (MMT) (International Wheat Council, 1994). Of this, about 100 MMT is traded each year on the international market.

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© Chapman & Hall 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. F. Morris
  • S. P. Rose

There are no affiliations available

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