Chronic Pain Management

  • R. M. Frank
Part of the Cancer Growth and Progression book series (CAGP, volume 10)

Abstract

Pain is a perception and as such its form and content are dependent upon the subjective response of the patient who is experiencing it. All too often, the treatment of chronic pain depends upon the attitudes and mores of the health professionals rather than the patient’s own perception (1). Generally speaking, pain progresses from an awareness to a discomfort, it may then intensify until it dominates the senses and finally explodes into agony (4). Pain at times can be debilitating as well as extremely unpleasant and is usually perceived as evidence of ill health. It evokes anxiety and fear of the unknown.

Keywords

Chronic Pain Optic Neuritis Narcotic Analgesic Central Nervous System Effect Morphine Sulfate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Algos: A Pain Forum 1:1 March, 1976Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    American Hospital Formulary Service, ASHP Bethesda, Maryland, 1986Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Facts and Comparisons: Lippincott Co, Philadelphia, PA, 1982Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Fairley P: The Conquest of Pain. Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1978Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Foley K: The practical use of narcotic analgesics. The Medical Clinics of North America Symposium on Clinical Pharmacology of Symptom Control 66: 5, 1091, 1982Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Frank RM: Treating Chronic Pain. ASHP Signal Sept/Oct:37, 1982Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Goodman, Gilman: The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 6th ed. MacMillan Co Inc, New York, 1980Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gotz V: Control of Cancer Related Pain. Squibb CPE 1:2, 1980Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Holmes AH: Morphine intravenous infusion for chronic pain. Drug Intell Clin Pharm 12: 556, 1978Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Inturrisi C: Narcotic drugs. The Medical Clinics of North America Symposium on Clinical Pharmacology of Symptom Control. 66: 5, 1061, 1982Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Kaiko RF et al: Narcotics in the elderly. The Medical Clinics of North America Symposium on Clinical Pharmacology of Symptom Control. 66: 5, 1079, 1982Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Kantor T: Control of pain by monsteroidalanti-inflammatory drugs. The Medical Clinics of North America Symposium on Clinical Pharmacology of Symptom Control 66: 5, 1053, 1982Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Marks RM et al: Undertreatment of medical inpatients with narcotic analgesics. Ann Intern Med-78:173, 1973Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Melzack R, Wald PD: Pain mechanisms: a new theory. Science 150: 971, 1965PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Mount BM et al: Use of the Brompton mixture in treating the chronic pain of malignant disease. ND Summer. Needs of the Cancer Patient, 1977Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Porter J, Jick H: Addiction rare in patients treated with narcotics. NEJM 302: 123, 1980PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Twycross RG: Heroin vs. morphine. Pain 3: 93, 1977PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Wang JK, Nauss CA, Thomas JE: Pain relief by intrathecally applied morphine in man. Anesthesiology 50:2, 149, 1979PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Wolff B: Perceptions of pain. The Sciences. July/August 10–15, 1980Google Scholar

Updated References

  1. 1.
    Abram SE (ed): Cancer Pain. Boston, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1989Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kramer R: Diagnosis and Management of Pain in Patients with Cancer. Basel, S. Karger, 1988Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. M. Frank

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations