The Phonological Factor in Reading and Spelling of Greek

  • Costos D. Porpodas
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASID, volume 52)

Abstract

The way Greek children are taught to read and spell in primary schools is based on the teachers’ initiative and inventive attitude, as well as on the application of methodologies that had been borrowed from other alphabetic orthographies such as English, French, and German. These teaching methods are usually applied to the teaching of reading and spelling of Greek with or without slight modification. The dependence on nonindigenous methods is thought to be due to the shortage of Greek studies of cognitive aspects of reading and spelling, as well as due to a paucity of studies on the methodolgical approaches on teaching reading and spelling of Greek (Porpodas, 1986; Porpodas, 1987; Megalokonomos, 1987; Zakestidou & Maniou-Vakali, 1987). As a consequence, the controversies about the efficiency of the different methods of teaching reading and spelling of Greek have remained as a theoretical issue without being tested by experimental studies (Viggopouls, 1969).

Keywords

Poor Reader Good Reader Reading Speed Articulatory Suppression Phonological Code 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Costos D. Porpodas
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EducationUniversity of PatrasPatrasGreece

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