The Effects of CAPD on Hypertension Control

  • Anne S. Lindblad
  • Joel W. Novak
  • Karl D. Nolph
Part of the Developments in Nephrology book series (DINE, volume 23)

Abstract

Hypertension (elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure) is common in patients with chronic renal disease and is estimated to affect about 80% of patients entering dialysis. Confirmation of that estimate in a sufficiently large sample of entering ESRD patients is not available for any therapeutic modality, nor are responses to antihypertensive therapy known. In the general population, several classic studies [1–3] have indicated that high blood pressure is a leading risk factor predisposing to stroke, heart failure, and kidney failure, and that blood pressure control is generally a worthy therapeutic objective. Indeed, patients with diastolic pressures in excess of 105 mm Hg who sustain a reduction of blood pressure by any means can usually expect prolonged useful life from reduced occurrences of stroke, congestive heart failure and renal failure.

Keywords

Diastolic Blood Pressure Chronic Renal Failure Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Multiple Risk Factor Intervention Trial Lead Risk Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne S. Lindblad
    • 1
  • Joel W. Novak
    • 1
  • Karl D. Nolph
    • 2
  1. 1.Data Coordinating CenterThe EMMES CorporationPotomacUSA
  2. 2.University of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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