Effects of Prenatal Lead Exposure on Infant Size at Birth

  • R. L. Bornschein
  • J. Grote
  • T. Mitchell
  • P. A. Succop
  • K. N. Dietrich
  • K. M. Krafft
  • P. B. Hammond

Summary

It is well established that high levels of maternal lead exposure during pregnancy can result in a spectrum of adverse outcomes for the foetus, including spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, preterm delivery, and small-for-gestational-age deliveries. Less is known about lead-related intrauterine growth retardation at levels of lead exposure encountered by the general population. In an interim analysis of data from 202 inner-city infants, prenatal lead exposure was inversely related to birth weight and birth length. Maternal blood lead (PbB) concentrations ranged from 1 to 26 µg dl−1 \(\left( {\bar x = 7.6} \right)\). The lead effect varied from a negative 58 g per natural log unit increment in PbB for 18-year-old mothers to a negative 601 g per natural log unit increment in 30-year-old mothers.

Keywords

Birth Weight Preterm Delivery Lead Exposure Prenatal Visit Birth Length 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ECSC-EEC-EAEC, Brussels — Luxembourg; EPA, USA 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Bornschein
  • J. Grote
  • T. Mitchell
  • P. A. Succop
  • K. N. Dietrich
  • K. M. Krafft
  • P. B. Hammond

There are no affiliations available

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