Food Gels pp 233-289 | Cite as

Gelatine

  • F. A. Johnston-Banks
Part of the Elsevier Applied Food Science Series book series (EAFSS)

Abstract

Of all the hydrocolloids in use today surely none has proved as popular with the general public and found favour in as wide a range of food products as gelatine. A sparkling, clear dessert jelly has become the archetypal gel and the clean melt-in-the-mouth texture is the characteristic that has yet to be duplicated by any polysaccharide. Despite its apparently unfashionable status, more gelatine is sold to the food industry than any other gelling agent. It is relatively cheap to produce in quantity, and there is a ready supply of suitable raw material.

Keywords

Isoelectric Point Imino Acid Glucose Syrup Confectionery Product Gelatine Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Science Publishers Ltd 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. A. Johnston-Banks
    • 1
  1. 1.Gelatine Products LimitedCheshireUK

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