Utilization of the Energy of Absorbed Nutrients

  • M. Ryle
  • E. R. Ørskov

Abstract

In view of the importance of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) as a source of energy for ruminants, this section will emphasize their significance. Since the Cambridge team, led by Sir John Barcroft, established that VFAs were in fact the main source of energy for these animals, much effort has been devoted to investigating their role in detail. This has led to many interesting debates. One of these was related to the finding that metabolizable energy (ME) from long, poor-quality roughages was utilized less efficiently than that from concentrate feeds. Since roughages tend to yield relatively more acetic acid and concentrates relatively more propionic acid (see Chapter 3), one hypothesis was that the amount of acetic acid produced was causally related to poor ME utilization.

Keywords

Propionic Acid Milk Yield Volatile Fatty Acid Intermittent Infusion Body Reserve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Science Publishers Ltd 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Ryle
    • 1
  • E. R. Ørskov
    • 2
  1. 1.Stocksbridge, SheffieldUK
  2. 2.Applied Research DepartmentThe Rowett Research InstituteUK

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