Clinical significance of apolipoprotein B containing lipoprotein particles

  • J. C. Fruchart
  • J. M. Bard
  • H. J. Parra
  • I. Juhan-Vague
  • V. Clavey

Abstract

Apolipoprotein B (Apo B) exists in different types of particles in human plasma: Lp B containing only Apo B, Lp B:E containing Apo B and Apo E, Lp B:C-III containing Apo B and Apo C-III, Lp B:(a) containing Apo B and Apo (a) and soon. The physicochemically defined lipoproteins were found to be heterogeneous with respect to this concept. A particle such as Lp B, for example, may occur in any segment of the density spectrum depending on the composition and content of its lipid complement. These particles are metabolically distinct and their quantification is essential for better understanding of lipid transport disorders. Using new immunological procedures, we have identified some subpopulations of Apo B containing lipoproteins which are more abondant in atherosclerotic patients and which characterize some dyslipoproteinemic states. Drugs decreasing Apo B act differently on these different types of particles. The results presented substantiate the usefulness of the study of lipoprotein particles defined by their apolipoprotein composition for future clinical, pharmacological and epidemiological studies.

Keywords

Lipoprotein Particle Bile Acid Sequestrant Hypolipidemic Drug Hypercholesterolemic Subject Atherosclerotic Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. C. Fruchart
    • 1
  • J. M. Bard
    • 1
  • H. J. Parra
    • 1
  • I. Juhan-Vague
    • 1
  • V. Clavey
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut PasteurSERLIA et U. Inserm 325Lille CédexFrance

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