Gas Exchange, Chlorophyll a Fluorescence, and Metabolite Levels in Leaves of Trifolium Subterraneum During Long-Term Exposure to Elevated CO2

  • T. Betsche
  • F. Morin
  • F. Cote
  • F. Gaugain
  • M. Andre

Abstract

In many C3-plants, the initial stimulation by high CO2 of photosynthesis declines during long-term exposure to high CO2. This is accompanied by excessive starch accumulation, and in some species chloroplast distortion has been observed (1). It has been suggested that the breakdown of the thylakoid proton gradient causes the decline of photosynthesis or, alternatively, that “feedback” because of insufficient sink or transport capacity for sucrose stimulates starch formation and finally inhibits photosynthesis (2). This communication reports of experiments with whole plants or attached leaves which were transferred to high CO2 or to high light and kept under these conditions for one to two weeks.

Keywords

High Light Carbohydrate Level Attached Leaf Trifolium SUBTERRANEUM Initial Stimulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Cave, L.N., Tolley, L.C., and Strain, B.R. (1981) Physiol. Plant. 51 171–174CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Delucia, E.H., Sasek, T.W., and Strain, B.R. (1985) Photosynthesis Res., 7, 175–184CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Andre, M., Massimino, D. and Daguenet, A. (1978) Physiol. Plant. 38, 1421–1431Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Schreiber, U, Schliwa, U., and Bilger, W. (1986) Photosynthesis Res. 10, 51–62CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bilger, W., and Schreiber, U. (1986) Photosynthesis Res., 10, 303–308CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Leegood, R.C. and Furbank, R.T. (1984) Planta 162, 450–456CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Sharkey, T.D. and Badger, M.R. (1982) Planta 156, 199–206CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Rufty, T.W. and Huber, S.C. (1983) Plant Physiol 72, 474–480PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Dietz, K.J., Neimanis, S., and Heber, U. (1984) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 767, 444–450CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Stitt, M., Huber, S. and Kerr, P. (1987) in The Biochemistry of Plants (Preiss J., ed.), Vol. 10, pp. 327–455, Academic PressGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Foyer, C.H. (1987) Plant Physiol. Biochem. 25, 649–657Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Gardeström P. (1987) FEBS Letters 212: 114–118CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Betsche
    • 1
  • F. Morin
    • 1
  • F. Cote
    • 1
  • F. Gaugain
    • 1
  • M. Andre
    • 1
  1. 1.Departement de BiologieCen CadaracheSt-Paul-Lez-DuranceFrance

Personalised recommendations