Storage

  • W. M. Bugbee
Part of the World Crop Series book series (WOCS)

Abstract

In regions of the world with mild climates (for example most of Western Europe), sugar-beet roots are usually delivered to the factory directly from the field or, after a few days, from small storage piles (clamps).

Keywords

Sugar Beet Botrytis Cinerea Maleic Hydrazide Invert Sugar Storage Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Chapman & Hall 1993

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  • W. M. Bugbee

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