The Expression of HLA-DR, IL-2R, ICAM-1 and TNF Alpha Molecules as Possible Prognostic Elements of Hypertrophic Scarring in Burns

  • G. Magliacani
  • M. Stella
  • C. Castagnoli
  • P. Richiardi

Abstract

Patients suffering from hypertrophic scarring secondary to extensive burns have to expect modifications in their social and working life, together with lengthy physiotherapeutic and surgical procedures, in a background of uncertainty as regards the long-term evolution of the scars and the quality of the final result. It is thus important to study the little known aetiopathogenic factors involved, in order to propose new therapeutic approaches in burn scars.

Keywords

Major Histocompatibility Complex Class Lichen Planus Hypertrophic Scar Mycosis Fungoides Bullous Pemphigoid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Magliacani
    • 1
  • M. Stella
    • 1
  • C. Castagnoli
    • 2
  • P. Richiardi
    • 2
  1. 1.Centro Grandi UstionatiCTOTurinItaly
  2. 2.Dipartimento di GeneticaUniversità di TorinoTurinItaly

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