Stress Tolerance in Newer Triticales Compared to Other Cereals

  • Robin S. Jessop
Part of the Developments in Plant Breeding book series (DIPB, volume 5)

Abstract

The world status of triticale’s level of adaptation to adverse environments is reviewed with particular emphasis on tolerance to acid soils (high in Al), low nutrient availability, drought stress and temperature stress. Tolerance to acid soils has been increased through screening for Al tolerance in nutrient culture systems; we still need better information both on the genetics of Al tolerance and its stability under field conditions. The ability of triticale to tolerate lower levels of phosphorus, nitrogen and the trace elements copper, manganese and zinc than wheat should be confirmed in a range of environments and utilised more widely. Drought tolerance (compared to bread wheats) appears to be improving, particularly with newer complete triticales; this again needs confirmation in differing environments with some more detailed measurements of the plant mechanisms involved. Both winter and spring triticales now have good tolerance of cold conditions compared to other cereals but further work is still needed to improve high temperature tolerance at flowering.

Keywords

Bread Wheat Durum Wheat Winter Cereal Aluminium Tolerance Waterlogging Tolerance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin S. Jessop
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agronomy and Soil ScienceUniversity of New EnglandArmidaleAustralia

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