Dynamical Flow Tomography by Laser Induced Fluorescence

  • S. Deusch
  • T. Dracos
  • P. Rys
Conference paper
Part of the Fluid Mechanics and its Applications book series (FMIA, volume 36)

Abstract

Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging is a well developed method to directly obtain the 2D structure of a flow by imaging chemical species which emit a sufficient signal to be detected. The principles of LIF are also applicable to a 3D-imaging technique. The first one to put this into practice was Dahm et al.[l], others are Merkel[5] and Dracos et al.[2]. This work presents the development of a new 3D-LIF imaging method where the illuminating laser beam is swept parallel to the imaging sensor and a volume of 45×45×18 mm dimension is recorded with a resolution of 256×256×90 pixels. The obtained 3D images are evaluated to extract the velocity, vorticity, and rate-of-strain tensor fields from the grey level distribution by an alternative technique to [1]. Also some experimental evaluations are presented briefly.

Keywords

Direct Numerical Simulation Laser Induce Fluorescence Fluorescent Tracer Velocity Gradient Tensor Unstable Node 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Deusch
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Dracos
    • 1
  • P. Rys
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Swiss Federal Institute of TechnologyZurichSwitzerland
  2. 2.Dept. of Industrial Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringSwitzerland

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