Enantioselective Catalysis with Transition Metal Complexes

  • Henri Brunner
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSE, volume 320)

Abstract

Metabolism in man, animal and plant uses optically active compounds, such as L amino acids, D sugars etc., and not racemic mixtures. As a consequence, biology should be approached with optically pure compounds of the correct configuration and not with racemic mixtures. This refers to additives to human food, supplementation of animal food, drugs and agrochemicals, an impressive list of applications which demonstrates the importance of optically active compounds. Therefore, the synthesis of optically active compounds is a challenging problem for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

Keywords

Folic Acid Racemic Mixture Active Ligand Stereogenic Center Enantioselective Hydrogenation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Henri Brunner
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Anorganische ChemieUniversität RegensburgRegensburgGermany

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