Scanning Interferometric Apertureless Microscopy at 10 Angstrom Resoultion

  • H. K. Wickramasinghe
  • Y. Martin
  • F. Zenhausern
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSE, volume 319)

Abstract

Near-field scanning microscopy at microwave frequencies (1) and its extension to the visible region (NSOM)(2, 3) at around 50 nm resolution has attracted much attention (4–7). Recently, a Scanning Interferometric Apertureless Microscope (SIAM) was introduced (8, 9, 14) where the scattered electric field variation due to a vibrating and scanning probe tip in close proximity to a sample surface is measured by encoding it as a modulation in the phase of one arm of an interferometer. Here, we review the SIAM technique and present images of various samples at a resolution of 1 nm - almost two orders of magnitude superior to other NSQM’s. A basic theory based on coupled dipoles is put forward and compared with experiments. It shows that the contrast mechanisms are fundamentally different to those in regular near-field optical microscopes due to a unique dipole-dipole mechanism. Furthermore, the theory predicts the ability to measure complex susceptibility down to the atomic level.

Keywords

Optical Image Couple Dipole Scattered Field Force Gradient Interferometric Phase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. K. Wickramasinghe
    • 1
  • Y. Martin
    • 1
  • F. Zenhausern
    • 1
  1. 1.IBM Research DivisionT.J. Watson Research CenterNew YorkUSA

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